Youth respond to Obama's reelection

By Silver Friedline on November 10, 2012

A mirror image of 2008 appeared on the Facebook newsfeed this past Tuesday as many young members of states all around the U.S. claim they plan to move out of reach of Obama’s laws and health-care system come his reelection.

Now that his victory is ensured though, how are the voters – both republican and democrat – really reacting?

Many young voters (ages 18-29) expressed both joy and disappointment about the outcome of the 2012 election via internet sites such as Facebook, Twitter, and Tumblr this week; many saying that the reelection of Barack Obama was no surprise. “Of course I thought [Obama] would win,” said Ali Searcy (age 18), a student at Syracuse University. ” Throughout history there have been two “evils” running for the presidency. I think the job itself attracts controversial people. Obama will do what every president before him has tried to do- whatever is best for our country.”

Another young voter, David Garcia (age 18), agreed that “this election was mostly a choice between two bad candidates,” however David did not share Ali’s faith in Obama, “ I think Obama doesn’t have the ability to fix the economy as much as we want… Where Romney might.”  The idea that the 2012 race was between two fairly-poor candidates was a commonly expressed viewpoint during the weeks leading up to the November
6 poll-date.

Statistics did show, however, that an “overwhelming 60 percent [of voters] between the ages of 18 and 29 chose to re-elect Obama and 37 percent voted for his challenger Mitt Romney” (http://www.youthtoday.org/view_article.cfm?article_id=5678). There must be some reason over half of young voters saw Obama as the “lessor of two evils”.

Gabe Ramos (age 18), from Bakersfield, CA, said that Obama was “a level headed leader. He is aware that there’s no one right answer. No, he hasn’t been a miracle worker for the nation, but he still tries to keep democracy and patriotism alive in Washington…so far hes done an alright job at just keeping us afloat.” Many young voters agreed that Obama was able to support the country in a time of crisis, however Laura Neblett (age 19), another student at Syracuse university, “wanted Mitt to win” because she was “mostly concerned with the improvement of jobs becoming available.” A CSUB student, Hayley Lampela (age 18), voted against Romney “because he was extremely sexist and wanted to take away my right to take birth control.” This view on Romney is not uncommon among young people, all over the world people questioned his ideology.

Andrew Baker (age 19), from Colchester, England, said that “Romney just seemed far too left wing for my taste to the point where his morals and views seem dated.” Kimberly Alegrete (age 18), a student at San Francisco Sate University, said that she saw Romney as “a moderate republican who tried to be shaped into a real conservative by the republican party and the conservative republicans in it,” furthermore “he was a great governor in Massachusetts, I just don’t think he was meant to be a president no matter if he was democrat or republican.”

In the end the reelection of President Barack Obama has left some young voters joyous and others dismayed. Some young citizens may hold to their threats to leave U.S. soil and some may stay in hopes of better candidates in the 2016 election, if anything is to be certain though, it is that Barack Obama was voted into four more years under the White House roof by the citizens of this great nation.

I write, I take photos, I do my thang.

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